Raging Spaniard's House of Pancakes and Friendship
As a concept artist, sometimes your job is to inform design, research visual looks, inspire producers … its kind of varied and lacking in concise direction, but that also makes this fun.
At the beginning of a project though, its always good to be proactive and you want to impose your ideas as much as possible because you never, ever know what might stick. As soon as I hear a game idea I usually know what kind of art style it should have, what kind of mood I want it to have and whether its going to be cartoony, hand painted, realistic etc, etc. A while back at Gameloft I was working on a Pokemon rip (haha, sarcasm!) and I wanted the town segments to have a static camera so that the player could easily navigate to the shops and other points of interest without having to build a big explorable city environment.
So I settled on a basic 2 point perspective wide shot, then I added some points of interest. You want people to be able to tell immediately what your game is about, so add familiar things! I have an item shop in there, the player character interacting with his pet, other monsters going around, a mysterious place to explore and some background elements that give you a sense that there’s a lot more to see in this world I created.
The worst part of the exchange is getting something like this done and then see the game go in completely different directions, so sometimes you feel like its wasted work, but there’s always something positive to get out of it. Maybe your Art Director likes the way the creatures were designed, or the palette, or maybe he likes your disposition and gives you more screenshot mockup tasks. I don’t think its ever a waste of time to show that you actually care.

As a concept artist, sometimes your job is to inform design, research visual looks, inspire producers … its kind of varied and lacking in concise direction, but that also makes this fun.

At the beginning of a project though, its always good to be proactive and you want to impose your ideas as much as possible because you never, ever know what might stick. As soon as I hear a game idea I usually know what kind of art style it should have, what kind of mood I want it to have and whether its going to be cartoony, hand painted, realistic etc, etc. A while back at Gameloft I was working on a Pokemon rip (haha, sarcasm!) and I wanted the town segments to have a static camera so that the player could easily navigate to the shops and other points of interest without having to build a big explorable city environment.

So I settled on a basic 2 point perspective wide shot, then I added some points of interest. You want people to be able to tell immediately what your game is about, so add familiar things! I have an item shop in there, the player character interacting with his pet, other monsters going around, a mysterious place to explore and some background elements that give you a sense that there’s a lot more to see in this world I created.

The worst part of the exchange is getting something like this done and then see the game go in completely different directions, so sometimes you feel like its wasted work, but there’s always something positive to get out of it. Maybe your Art Director likes the way the creatures were designed, or the palette, or maybe he likes your disposition and gives you more screenshot mockup tasks. I don’t think its ever a waste of time to show that you actually care.

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